Which oil is the best choice?

Good afternoon everyone, this week has been filled with such an overwhelming feeling of gratitude. My first post came up just a few days ago and already I have reached a pretty big group of viewers. Thank you for the continued support. Feel free to leave comments, feedback, or any questions you may have. I’ve gotten people in the past asking me about oils, which is the best choice? First, we want to take into consideration what type of meal you will be preparing. If you are sautéing vegetables, meat, chicken, or fish I recommend olive oil. What if you want to occasionally fry some chicken or fish? I usually recommend canola or soybean oil. Now you are probably sitting there wide-eyed wondering why I would say the word “fry” on a future dietitian’s blog. Let me be clear, in no way am I encouraging, but I do know that we are all human beings and every so often we crave something oily, sweet, or salty. Anything in excess is not good for us so the key is: in moderation. How about the other oils? Right now the fad, “in-style” oil is coconut oil. It seems so exotic and healthy, right? Hate to break it to you, but coconut is actually one of the few plant oils that is high in saturated fats. What does saturated fats mean? Usually people call this “bad cholesterol” because it is capable of raising your cholesterol. The American Heart association says that foods high in saturated fat should be limited in a diet. So what foods contain saturated fat?

  • fatty beef,
  • lamb,
  • pork,
  • poultry with skin,
  • beef fat (tallow),
  • lard and cream,
  • butter,
  • cheese

You don’t see coconut oil on the list, but here’s the trick: all saturated fats are solid at room temperature. For example: animal fat or lard when it  cools down, butter, cheese, how about coconut oil that sits outside? Then we have your “good cholesterol” called monounsaturated fats. The “good cholesterol” is beneficial to your heart, but again in moderation. I know it’s a mouthful to take in, but let’s compare just a few nutrition labels so you can see for yourself.

20150716_185438 20150716_185408 20150716_185359

The first one is coconut, then vegetable, and finally olive oil. The serving size for all is 1 tablespoon. For each tablespoon we have 12 g of saturated fat for coconut, 1.5 g for vegetable, and 2 g for olive oil. Now I know you are probably thinking, ‘isn’t vegetable better then?’ let’s look at monounsaturated fats, coconut 0.5 g, vegetable 6 g, and olive oil 10 g.

http://www.heart.org

 

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